BonBonanza

I'm Bonnie, and I make stuff!

“Divine” Beret!

Posted on | September 28, 2011 | 21 Comments

So, some of you might be familiar with the “divine hat“, and let me tell you: it is positively brilliant! It also gave me the chance to learn front post stitch/ back post stitch, which is one that you will definitely be seeing used here again. I started following the pattern, but after the first round or two, I kinda just did my own thing.

Divine Beret! See the swirls?

The Divine Beret!

Anyway, I had been wanting to make a beret type hat for a while now, and I thought “why not combine the divine hat pattern with a beret?” After all, the only real difference between your typical hat shape and a beret is that the circle at the top is bigger and the decreasing more drastic.

So, this is more a “recipe”, because it’s a stylistic adaptation of someone else’s pattern:

It uses a J hook and then an H hook, and Caron Simply Soft. (Nearly a full skein of the stuff, if you have the average size.)

~~~~~~~~~~~~

Dc=Double Crochet

Fps=Front Post Stitch (if you are unfamiliar with this stitch, like I was, just look here for a nice tutorial on it as well as the back post. It makes a lovely end product, and it’s really easy.)

Bps=Back Post Stitch

Sc=Single Crochet

Sl=Slip Stitch

~~~~~~~~~~~~

    1. Make a “magic circle” (Which you make thusly: You take the yarn, and make a square knot, only you don’t pull it tight. It keeps the center of circular pieces nice and closed, because you can tighten it after the stitches have been made in it, unlike just chain stitching a loop.)
    2. Dc 15 around the magic circle (using J hook)
    3. Fps around the circle in every stitch
    4. fps in every fps stitch, dc in between the fps
    5. make sure that your fps are lining up, in order to make that spiffy swirl pattern
    6. increase 1 dc in each space between the fps every other row- as the circle expands, you’ll still have the same amount of fps lines
    7. continue until your circle is roughly 4 to 6 inches bigger than your head in diameter (all on one side)
    8. make a new fps in the middle of every space between the fps rows already present
    9. switch to your H hook! go around 2 or 3 rounds, then decrease 1 dc in every segment of dc’s in between the fps (do NOT decrease out any fps) every other row for 3 or 4 rows, then every row until it is the right size opening for your head
    10. do 2or 3 rows where every other stitch is fps, and the ones between are bps, sc 1, sl 1, tie off and weave in ends. Tighten the magic circle by pulling on the original loose end, and tie a knot in it, then weave it in.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

My beautiful beret!

"Divine" Beret, top view. See the nifty swirl pattern? Front Post Stitch. So cool! <3

    So there you have it! One “divine” beret. :D

Comments

21 Responses to ““Divine” Beret!”

  1. Valerie
    October 21st, 2011 @ 8:13 pm

    Hi, I found your blog today, and I love it! I’m making the divine beret, and I’m having a little trouble with the instructions. On number 8,” make a new fps in the middle of every space between the fps rows already present”, does that mean I’m to make 2 fps on every fps from the previous row?
    And on number 9,”switch to your H hook! go around 2 or 3 rounds, then decrease 1 dc in every segment of dc’s in between the fps (do NOT decrease out any fps) every other row for 3 or 4 rows, then every row until it is the right size opening for your head” by go around 2 or 3 rounds, am I still doing what I did in number 8, or doing the increasing with the doubles, or what?
    I’m sorry I’m not good at following patterns! I’m kind of a visual person! Thanks so much for sharing your patterns!

  2. Bonnie
    October 21st, 2011 @ 8:36 pm

    Thank you, I’m sure glad you’re enjoying! :)
    Now, on number 8: you just start a new fps in between each row of fps you already have going.
    visualise the lines as the ridges made by fps and the dotted line as the new fps row:
    | | | |
    | | | |
    | : | : | : |
    | : | : | : |
    ~~~~~~~~~
    So, you center a new fps in the space between the fps you already have. And on number 9, when you switch to your H hook. There are dc’s between all the fps ridges, and in this step you skip 1 dc in every segment of the round in between the fps’s. You have to make sure to NOT skip any fps, so that your pretty ridges stay intact. You can do this every other round which is the word I meant to use, sorry, for 3 or 4 rounds, and then decrease 1 dc per space between fps’s for 2 or 3 rounds until the opening for your head is significantly smaller, but still big enough to fit your head.
    Imagine the quotes as dc and the lines as fps:
    |” ” ” “|” ” ” “|
    |” ” “|” ” ” “|
    ~~~~~~
    this is to make it smaller at the opening so it doesn’t fall off your noggin. ^_^
    Hope this helped!

  3. Ashley
    November 10th, 2011 @ 1:18 am

    I realy like this hat thanks for letting us use it. I have one question my lines are not swirling what am I doing wrong.I am on the increase of 4 in the middle and they are not turning what am I doing wrong.

    Thanks Ashley

  4. Bonnie
    November 10th, 2011 @ 2:55 am

    Ummm…? OH lol I was so confused for a good 10 minutes because I was completely clueless as to how you could have managed that. The top circle part of the hat doesn’t really swirl much, but just keep on going, and it happens. :D So, press on.

  5. rosemary
    December 19th, 2011 @ 11:20 pm

    on the divie beret do you join at the end of the round and do you chain at the begining of a rowand at the begining how do you get the dc as you begin do you chain 3

  6. Bonnie
    December 20th, 2011 @ 5:35 pm

    First of all, the hat is worked in kinda a spiral method, which means theres no rounds to join. So, when you need to dc, you just dc.

  7. rosemary
    December 20th, 2011 @ 7:58 pm

    when it says all on ine side row7 what do you mean all on one side and how do you measure your head

  8. Bonnie
    December 20th, 2011 @ 9:39 pm

    OK, what section are you in? This whole recipe is *approximate*, depending on your preferences, the size of your head, how tight your stitches are, etc. It is NOT a pattern, so if you try to follow it exactly, odds are you’ll get a bit confused.

  9. shailah
    February 14th, 2012 @ 6:05 pm

    Hi!

    Could you explain further on the last part? “do 2or 3 rows where every other stitch is fps, and the ones between are bps, sc 1, sl 1, tie off and weave in ends. Tighten the magic circle by pulling on the original loose end, and tie a knot in it, then weave it in.”

    When I have ” the right size opening for the head” (section9), I don’t know what to do. I have 30 FPS and 2 DC between them. My first idea was to do FPS-BPS-FPS-BPS… all the way round. But then half of the FPS wouldn’t line with the previous ones… Should I do BPS in all the DCs of the previous round?

  10. Bonnie
    February 14th, 2012 @ 6:40 pm

    The “do 2or 3 rows where every other stitch is fps, and the ones between are bps, sc 1, sl 1, tie off and weave in ends. Tighten the magic circle by pulling on the original loose end, and tie a knot in it, then weave it in.” part means simply this:
    the fps makes a lovely little ridge, and at this point, you’re making a band which will look a little zigzaggy, because you’re doing fps, bps, fps, bps, all the way around for 2 or 3 rows, just until it’s a good width. Then, so that it ends neatly, you sc 1 stitch, then sl 1 stitch, then cut off of yor skein and weave in the ends. The original magic circle will have a small hole in the middle if you don’t pull it tight and then tie it of, and since I didn’t want a hole, that’s what I did.
    Something you could do to make the opening a more workable number of stitches is to either increase or decrease a few until it is, depending on how it fits. However, something else that may work easier is just taking out a few stitches.

  11. Jessie
    July 3rd, 2012 @ 7:37 pm

    this is a super cute pattern and i wanted to make it SO badly! but the directions are so unclear that i probably wont be able to :(

  12. Bonnie
    July 11th, 2012 @ 12:45 pm

    well, just let me know how I can help, and I’ll do my best to clarify. It’s pretty simple, once the initial points are figured out, so I hope I can help you out! :)

  13. Cori
    October 28th, 2012 @ 4:45 pm

    beautiful hat! I love the divine hat pattern, and I love your adaptation.

  14. Amanda
    November 1st, 2012 @ 3:08 am

    Hi!

    Love this pattern! I’m working on the beginning and a little confused, so I looked at the divine hat pattern in hopes of clearing it up. I saw that the hat pattern says to join each round, but for the beret I notice that you didn’t say anything about that. Also, what about ch3 to start rounds? The hat pattern say to ch2 for dc, but that isn’t the norm. It think I’ve figured out fpc (which is fpdc, right?) followed by dc, like in round 4.

    Any clarification would be lovely! Thanks for your work!

    A

  15. Amanda
    November 3rd, 2012 @ 2:36 am

    One more addition! Can you explain how you increase in round 6? I’ve been comparing what you have to the hat pattern, and the increase happens only in the first space, not every space. I tried increasing in every space every other row, but I didn’t get a swirl. I tried doing it in just the first space, and I got a swirl.

    A

  16. Divine Beret, Mark II : BonBonanza
    November 6th, 2012 @ 3:29 am

    […] (Especially if you have a complexion like mine!) This pattern should help clear things up with the Divine Beret, too, except for these […]

  17. Bonnie
    November 6th, 2012 @ 3:43 am

    When you increase in this particular pattern, you’ll increase only in the very last stitch of each section between fps ridges. Since you need to offset the fps one stitch from the previous fps, the increase will happen where the fps used to go. This extra dc and the new fps will share a spot, but due to the nature of the stitches, it looks very smooth. :)
    If you have any other questions, my new post might help you, I did a modified revisit to the Divine Beret.

  18. Bonnie
    November 6th, 2012 @ 3:45 am

    fps=fpdc, yes. This hat is worked in a continuous spiral, so no need to join any rounds, or do any chains to start rounds. You kinda just…go, and keep going.

  19. Desi
    December 5th, 2012 @ 4:46 am

    This is the first beret pattern i have yet found that actually turns out well!! Thanks so much for sharing!

  20. Jessie
    December 27th, 2012 @ 11:23 pm

    what do you mean in step 7?

  21. Bonnie
    December 31st, 2012 @ 4:53 pm

    You keep your work flat, working in a spiral. If you like, you can measure the diameter of your head, and then make the circle 4-6 inches bigger than your head’s diameter, OR, you can just compare it to your actual head. When I said “all on one side, I just meant that I compared the difference in diameter off-center, so that the center of my head and the center of the hat weren’t matching up.

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  • About Me

    I'm Bonnie, a newlywed stretching our finances through crafting. This is a blog about my crafts, cooking, and works of art, like sculpting, collage, or painting. I crochet, do macrame, bake/ cook food (though I prefer desserts!) and make candy, as well as sew, weave, and anything else I can get my hands on.
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