Banana Brownies

There was a really great sale on bananas. So  I,  forgetting temporarily that we hardly ever eat bananas, got a whole bunch. (As opposed to a half bunch. Ba-dum tiss.)

We left them untouched in our fruit basket, just sitting there, until they went from solid green… to splotchy brown. Fit for nothing but baked goods.

I had just resigned myself to a whole lot of banana bread, because I couldn’t bear to let all that healthy fruit go to waste, when my brain said, “haven’t we read something about how you can substitute bananas for eggs?”

Too true, brain! Ten points for Gryffindor! (Or Ravenclaw, whatever. Let’s not overthink this.)

My husband likes his brownies chewy, and my regular brownie recipe makes fudgy brownies, so I pulled up this recipe.

I also really love the kind of brownies that have the crumbly topping, so I pulled up this recipe, too.

I replaced the egg in BOTH recipes for 1 average-sized banana per large egg.

What I got was this:

Almost forgot I had to take a picture! Whoops lol
Almost forgot I had to take a picture! Whoops lol

It did need to be cooked some more, after this picture was taken, but that’s the nice thing about this idea– no raw egg! Just raw bananas. You could definitely taste the banana, but the consistency was nearly identical to if it had eggs. This would also be a good vegan alternative, fyi! 🙂

Organizing toys on the cheap

As I get together toys for my daughter to enjoy in the future, I’m discovering something pretty obvious: All this stuff needs to be organized!

I started with a simple crocheted mesh bag for those blocks I just made.

I think it suits those blocks nicely. :)
I think it suits those blocks nicely. 🙂

Honeycomb Mesh Bag:

Round-by-Round, worked in a continuous spiral:

  • 1: ch 4, dc 1 in 4th ch from hook. Ch3, dc in the same stitch you just dc’d in.  repeat until there are 6 dc, each with 3 ch separating the dc’s.
  • Make 1 dc in the ch-space between the previous row’s dc, as well as one dc in the top of  each of the previous row’s dc’s. Do this in every round you want to keep increasing the circular bottom of the bag.
  • Once you have the desired bottom diameter, simply dc 1 in each ch-space, and not in the tops of the dc’s. Continue separating each dc with 3 ch.
  • For the end, simply ch 3 after the previous dc, and sc the end of the ch into the ch-space. sl 1, cut off of the skein, and weave in ends.

As for the cord, I will explain with a pictorial:

Chain 1.

 

Hold it on its side, like this. You see how there's those 2 loops on the right, and the 1 on the left? That one is normally on the bottom.
Hold it on its side, like this. You see how there’s those 2 loops on the right, and the 1 on the left? That one is normally on the bottom.

 

2.)Yarn over, and stick your hook in between the single loop and the two loops.
Yarn over, and stick your hook in between the single loop and the two loops.

 

 

 

yarn over, pull through one loop, so you have three loops on your hook.
yarn over, pull through one loop, so you have three loops on your hook.

Pull your yarn through all three loops, (basically an hdc) and, ta-da! Nice stretchy cord, no base chain.

DIY baby wraps!

For a while, now, I’ve been a big fan of babywearing. For while the baby is small, there’s nothing better! You can keep your little one close, safe from creepy strangers, and still do everything you need to do.

So, in my third trimester, I made a moby wrap, using a tutorial from A Load of Craft.

Since it was 100% cotton, and the right measurements, I used a bandanna for the fabric panel she suggests. I also used 5.5 yards of turquoise jersey (the thick kind).

Simply cut the fabric 20″ from the edge, in order to have a 5.5 yards by 20″ strip. Then launder it, fold in half lengthwise to find the center, and sew your fabric square directly in the center of the strip. For directions on how to wear it, go here. (Since this is basically a moby wrap, the same directions apply.)

Her head is nicely supported in this wrap, honest. She was just arching her back at the time, because she had hiccups.
Her head is nicely supported in this wrap, honest. She was just arching her back at the time, because she had hiccups.

I must say, it came out pretty nice.

Then, a little bit ago, I stumbled upon a video about how to make an x-back wrap using 3 t-shirts. The lady who made the video made it abundantly clear that after she’d made it, she realized that you need to use t-shirts that fit you, not ones that are too big, like she said in the video.

3 t-shirts, huh? I can do that! So, I got out a few extra tees, lopped and tied, and I had a new carrier in about ten minutes.

This one's pre-hiccups. See, her legs are in sitting position, the sling supporting from her bum to under her knees.
This one’s pre-hiccups. See, her legs are in sitting position, the sling supporting from her bum to under her knees.

The only issue with the original was that the two load-supporting tubes were of different stretchiness-es. (So not a word.) The point being that the weight of my daughter was unevenly distributed on my back, and can certainly say that it made me paranoid and sore the whole time I was testing it out. And as for how my back fared– I’m still feeling it.

If you do try out the t-shirt method, (which I recommend) here’s some tips:

  • use t-shirts that are thick, stretchy, and (preferably) without side seams.
  • Find 2 tees that have almost identical fit, fabric thickness, and color. This will ensure good weight distribution and safety.
  • Try to use at least 1 long-sleeved shirt; the sleeves are good for tying  the two loops together in the back, and if you use  the sleeves of  the front panel’s shirt, it’ll color-coordinate with the front panel.
  • If you do use long sleeves to tie the X in the back, use both the sleeves to make the tied portion of the loops even longer. This creates even better weight distribution. (Save your back the pain, eh?)
  • The same lady who made the first video also made a follow-up video on how to use it safely, and I would recommend watching it, as well.
  • For your baby’s safety, as with all homemade baby gear, pay close attention and use common sense. If the fabric doesn’t seem stretchy enough, or you don’t feel comfortable using tees with side seams, or you think you ought to buy new shirts to use–adapt this to meet what you need. The most  important thing about babywearing is that both you and your little one feel safe with the situation.