DIY baby wraps!

For a while, now, I’ve been a big fan of babywearing. For while the baby is small, there’s nothing better! You can keep your little one close, safe from creepy strangers, and still do everything you need to do.

So, in my third trimester, I made a moby wrap, using a tutorial from A Load of Craft.

Since it was 100% cotton, and the right measurements, I used a bandanna for the fabric panel she suggests. I also used 5.5 yards of turquoise jersey (the thick kind).

Simply cut the fabric 20″ from the edge, in order to have a 5.5 yards by 20″ strip. Then launder it, fold in half lengthwise to find the center, and sew your fabric square directly in the center of the strip. For directions on how to wear it, go here. (Since this is basically a moby wrap, the same directions apply.)

Her head is nicely supported in this wrap, honest. She was just arching her back at the time, because she had hiccups.
Her head is nicely supported in this wrap, honest. She was just arching her back at the time, because she had hiccups.

I must say, it came out pretty nice.

Then, a little bit ago, I stumbled upon a video about how to make an x-back wrap using 3 t-shirts. The lady who made the video made it abundantly clear that after she’d made it, she realized that you need to use t-shirts that fit you, not ones that are too big, like she said in the video.

3 t-shirts, huh? I can do that! So, I got out a few extra tees, lopped and tied, and I had a new carrier in about ten minutes.

This one's pre-hiccups. See, her legs are in sitting position, the sling supporting from her bum to under her knees.
This one’s pre-hiccups. See, her legs are in sitting position, the sling supporting from her bum to under her knees.

The only issue with the original was that the two load-supporting tubes were of different stretchiness-es. (So not a word.) The point being that the weight of my daughter was unevenly distributed on my back, and can certainly say that it made me paranoid and sore the whole time I was testing it out. And as for how my back fared– I’m still feeling it.

If you do try out the t-shirt method, (which I recommend) here’s some tips:

  • use t-shirts that are thick, stretchy, and (preferably) without side seams.
  • Find 2 tees that have almost identical fit, fabric thickness, and color. This will ensure good weight distribution and safety.
  • Try to use at least 1 long-sleeved shirt; the sleeves are good for tying  the two loops together in the back, and if you use  the sleeves of  the front panel’s shirt, it’ll color-coordinate with the front panel.
  • If you do use long sleeves to tie the X in the back, use both the sleeves to make the tied portion of the loops even longer. This creates even better weight distribution. (Save your back the pain, eh?)
  • The same lady who made the first video also made a follow-up video on how to use it safely, and I would recommend watching it, as well.
  • For your baby’s safety, as with all homemade baby gear, pay close attention and use common sense. If the fabric doesn’t seem stretchy enough, or you don’t feel comfortable using tees with side seams, or you think you ought to buy new shirts to use–adapt this to meet what you need. The most  important thing about babywearing is that both you and your little one feel safe with the situation.
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Boot Liners

Lately, it’s been snowing nearly every day. I have some nice boots, but they could use a little extra insulation. (Plus, these things are so cute.)

See? Snow. Brrrr...
See? Snow. Brrrr…

So, here is your basic recipe for boot liners:

ch=chain

Sc=single crochet

dc=double crochet

tc=triple/treble crochet

4Dc-Shell=4dc

6Dc-Shell=6dc

***Make sure you take notes on what you do for the first sock, so that you can replicate your work on the second, and they’ll fit the same. You’ll want to try these on periodically, to be sure yo’ll have the right fit.

1) Get a pair of socks that fits you well. I’d recommend some ankle socks, preferably ones that aren’t too thin. Since these are a bout to be made into something completely different, don’t use ones you’ll miss as normal socks. Pick out some yarn (I used Red Heart Super Saver; just use something you won’t miss, the feel of it isn’t too much of an issue, though I wouldn’t use twine.)

2) Get a small-ish crochet hook (I used a G hook), and just push the hook through the weave of the sock, in order to add 1 round of sc to the top edge of the sock. Make sure to stretch out the sock as much as possible while you do this, so that the crocheted work has the right amount of give. Stretching it also opens up the weave of the sock’s fabric a bit for you to get the hook in.

3) After 1 round of sc, skip 3 between each 4dc-shell. Join rounds with 1 sl, and ch2 to make up the first dc of the next round. (For me, 1 round=11 shells) In each of the following rounds, make 1 4dc-shell between each of the previous round’s shells.

4) Continue using 4-dc shells until the curve in your calf, ( For me, this was at 10 rounds) then change to 6-dc shells. You shouldn’t need to increase the amount of shells. Continue using 6dc-shells until your boot liners have reached the height you want. This depends on what boots you have, or a matter of preference, but I stopped mine at 18 rounds of shells. Whenever you’re ready to finish off, all you have to do is end at the completion of a round, sl the round closed, and cut the work from your yarn. Then, just weave in the tails.

Ta-daa! A sock, plus a crocheted liner for the boots of your choice. :)
Ta-daa! A sock, plus a crocheted liner for the boots of your choice. 🙂
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