Japanese Cheesecake

My birthday cake!

Based off of a very popular online recipe, I made a wiggly, jiggly, delectable cake that was very memorable.

I’ll link to the original, and just add my tips to make it.

  1. Read the recipe all the way through before you do anything.
  2. Prepare your ingredients, because once you get going, it can be pretty involved.
  3. Follow the instructions, and DO use a springform pan (if you have one)but also,  do put  foil tightly around the bottom to prevent leakage. Don’t forget the parchment paper so removing the cake from the pan goes smoothly.

According to Tasty’s recipe:

Ingredients

for 6 servings

  • ½ cup (130 mL) milk
  • 4 oz (100 g) cream cheese
  • 7 tablespoons butter
  • 8 eggs, yolk
  • ¼ cup (60 g) flour
  • ¼ cup (60 g) cornstarch
  • 13 large egg whites
  • ⅔ cup (130 g) granulated sugar
  • parchment paper
  • strawberry, to serve
  • powdered sugar, to serve

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 320°F (160°C).
  2. In a small pot over medium heat, whisk the milk, cream cheese, and butter until smooth. Remove from heat and cool.
  3. In a large bowl, whisk the egg yolks until smooth, then slowly drizzle in the cream mixture, stirring until evenly combined.
  4. Sift in the flour and the cornstarch, whisking to make sure there are no lumps.
  5. In another large bowl, beat the egg whites with a hand mixer until you see soft peaks when lifting the mixer up from the egg whites. Gradually add the sugar while continuing to beat until you see hard peaks when lifting the mixer up.
  6. Take about ¼ of the egg whites and fold them into the egg yolk mixture, then repeat with the remaining egg whites until the batter is evenly combined.
  7. Place a 4-inch (10-cm) parchment paper strip around the edge of a 9×3-inch (23 cm) cake pan that is already lined with parchment at the bottom. If you are using a springform pan, make sure to wrap the bottom and sides completely in foil, twice, to prevent any leakage.
  8. Pour the batter into the parchment-lined pan and shake to release any large air bubbles.
  9. Place the filled pan into a larger baking pan or dish lined with 2 paper towels at the bottom. The paper towels ensure that the heat is distributed evenly along the bottom of the pan. Fill the larger pan about 1-inch (2-cm) with hot water.
  10. Bake for 25 minutes, then reduce the heat to 280°F (135°C), and bake for another 55 minutes, until the cake has risen to almost double its height.
  11. Remove from oven, and carefully, invert the cake onto your dominant hand and peel off the paper. Be extremely careful, the cake will be hot. You can also invert the cake onto a plate, but this will cause the cake to deflate more.
  12. Sprinkle the top of the cake with powdered sugar, slice, and serve with strawberries while still warm!
  13. Enjoy!

Goo Gone (or, what to do with homemade deodorant)

I made some baking soda deodorant for myself the other day. (Ok, it was a longer while ago than that…)

And it just didn’t work for me.  It was nice-smelling, and I really, really wanted it to work. But I guess my skin is a bit sensitive, and the format was just a bit messy, and I just wasn’t feeling it.

Vanilla-scented Goop in a tin. Sigh.

 

So it sat on the shelf. I didn’t want to throw it out.

Fast forward to sometime last week, when I discovered that making a paste of oil and baking soda is a recommended way to remove goo from glass. I had some glass jars and bottles I was hoping to re-purpose, so I had to try it!

 

Put the gunk on the goo that you want gone.

It worked perfectly!

Squeaky clean!

Keep in mind that removing the actual sticker goo takes some scrubbing, and that you should wash it with dish soap to remove the oil. But I sure love being able to repurpose those lovely glass jars and bottles that accumulate in our house.

How to grow citrus from seed, my foolproof method.

Seriously, it’s amazingly simple. I’d recommend that you don’t buy seeds online, though, unless there are pictures of the actual seeds, or the source is a proven, trustworthy source. Because:

This is what a viable seed looks like.

 

That is a viable seed. Round, full, fat. This thing will actually grow. The one unfortunate time I ordered citrus seeds online, I got something like THIS:

Useless. This thing is nothing but an empty seed coat.

Flat, empty, useless. This is literally the empty shell of a seed. There is no actual seed inside. It’s like a nutshell with no nut.
Useless.
But if you get a viable seed, they’re very easy to grow. I have about 80% germination rate with this method. It’s pretty foolproof.
1.Use the right seeds.
2. Peel the seeds. (I know it’s tempting to skip this, but DON’T. The results will probably be very slow-to-sprout seeds, or a much lower germination rate. Or they’ll get all moldy before germinating properly.

They look a little like this once peeled. Little darker dot on the rounder end of the seed.

3. Put the peeled seeds onto a moist paper towel in a zip-top bag, and leave it in a warm (not too warm) windowsill.

Good to go.

The bag acts like a little greenhouse for the seeds, which means they’ll be protected from chills or drying out when they’re so tiny and delicate. I like to label and date these, as my kids love to grow any and every mature seed we find in our fruits, and I know I indulge them 100% because I just love watching citrus grow.

Baby grapefruit I started a few months ago. So cute!

Their seeds sprout so easily, their leaves are so green and fragrant, and, of course, they make fruit! How awesome is that? It does take a long time for them to bear, if ever, but… I’m growing these just for decorative purposes, honestly. I just love to look at them.